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The Latina Center

Immigrants participate in church services and bond with other immigrants that share the same experiences. Undocumented Latinos also find support from friends, family and the community that serve as coping mechanisms. Some Latinos state that their children are the reason they have the strength to keep on going. They want their children to have a future and give them things they aren’t able to have themselves. The community is able to provide certain resources that immigrant families need such as tutoring for their children, financial assistance, and counseling services.

The proportion of Hispanics who are Catholic has dropped from 2009 (when it was 57%), while the proportion of unaffiliated Hispanics has increased since 2009 (when it was 15%). Among Hispanic Protestant community, most are evangelical, but some belong to mainline denominations. Compared to Catholic, unaffiliated, and mainline Protestant Hispanics, Evangelical Protestant Hispanics are substantially more likely to attend services weekly, pray daily, and adhere to biblical liberalism.

The majority of Mexico’s Afro-descendants are Afromestizos, i.e. “mixed-race”. Individuals with significantly high amounts of African ancestry make up a very low percentage of the total Mexican population, the majority being recent black immigrants from Africa, the Caribbean and elsewhere in the Americas. According to the Intercensal survey carried out by the Mexican government, Afro-Mexicans make up 1.2% of Mexico’s population, the Afro-Mexican category in the Intercensal survey includes people who self-identified solely as African and people who self-identified as partially African.

The inhabitants of Easter Island are Pacific Islanders and since the island belongs to Chile they are theoretically Hispanic or Latino. Because Hispanic roots are considered aligned with a European ancestry (Spain/Portugal), Hispanic ancestry is defined solely as an ethnic designation . While originally the term referred primarily to the Hispanos of New Mexico within the United States, today, organizations in the country use the term as a broad catchall to refer to persons with a historical and cultural relationship with Spain regardless of race and ethnicity.

Its holdings included present-day California, New Mexico, Nevada, Arizona and Texas, all of which were part of Mexico from its independence in 1821 from Spain until the end of the Mexican–American War in 1848. Conversely, Hispanic immigrants to the New York/New Jersey metropolitan area derive from a broad spectrum of Latin American states.

According to a 2010 study, the median household wealth of single https://mail.dientugiaphuc.com/surprising-details-about-costa-rican-girls-exposed/ is $120, compared with single white women’s median household wealth of $41,500. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 32.2 percent of Latina women work in the service sector, compared with only 20 percent of white women, and service workers are almost 20 percent less likely to have either paid sick leave or retirement benefits.

The Northeast region is dominated by Puerto Ricans and Dominican Americans, having the highest concentrations of both in the country. In the Mid Atlantic region, centered on the DC Metro Area, Salvadoran Americans are the largest of Hispanic groups. In both the Great Lakes States and the South Atlantic States, Mexicans and Puerto Ricans dominate. Mexicans dominate in the rest of the country, including the Western United States, South Central United States and Great Plains states. Preference of use between the terms among Hispanics and Latinos in the United States often depends on where users of the respective terms reside.

Latinas also have higher rates of gestational diabetes, which puts them at greater risk for type 2 diabetes later in life. Latina women experience unintended pregnancy at twice the rate experienced by white women. Latina women experienced higher rates of human papillomavirus, or HPV, than white women as of 2010 and twice the death rate from cervical cancer. Seventeen percent of Latina women receive Medicaid, compared to 9 percent for white women.

According to the 2017 American Community Survey, 65% of Hispanic and Latinos identified as White. The largest numbers of those who consider themselves White Hispanics come from within the Mexican, Puerto Rican, Cuban, Colombian and Spanish communities.

In addition, some academic centers at community colleges, public universities and Ivy League universities are replacing Latino program names that were established in previous decades with new Latinx-focused names. Yet the use of Latinx is not common practice, and the term’s emergence has generated debate about its appropriateness in a gendered language like Spanish. English speakers, saying it ignores the Spanish language and its gendered form.1 Still, there are examples of the term’s use in Spanish in the U.S. and abroad.2 Meanwhile, others see Latinx as a gender- and LGBTQ-inclusive term, reflecting a broader movement within the U.S. around gender identity. However, for the population it is meant to describe, only 23% of U.S. adults who self-identify as Hispanic or Latino have heard of the term Latinx, and just 3% say they use it to describe themselves, according to a nationally representative, bilingual survey of U.S.

  • Defending usage of the term against critics arguing linguistic imperialism, Brooklyn College professors María R. Scharrón-del Río and Alan A. Aja argued that the Spanish language itself is a form of linguistic imperialism for Latin Americans.
  • While Latinx use is growing in Spain, the Royal Spanish Academy rejects the use of -x and -e as gender-neutral alternatives to the collective masculine -o ending.
  • While the term appears in Spanish in Puerto Rico and other regions of Latin America, the term Latinx has been criticized for being used largely in the United States while not as common in other Spanish-speaking countries.
  • The term Latinx has been sweeping across college campuses in the nation with the intent of creating inclusion while inadvertently pitting members of the Latino community into a cultural war.

The Mexican government census lists religion but its categories are confusing, confusing those of some Protestant sects which practice Judaic rituals with Jewish groups. There is also controversy as to whether to count those Crypto-Jews who have converted to Judaism.

Instead, the OMB has decided that the term should be “Hispanic or Latino” because regional usage of the terms differs. Hispanic is commonly used in the eastern portion of the United States, whereas Latino is commonly used in the western portion of the United States. Since the 2000 Census, the identifier has changed from “Hispanic” to “Spanish/Hispanic/Latino”.

The usage of both terms has changed to adapt to a wide range of geographical and historical influences. The term “Hispanic” was used first; later, some Hispanics in the western United States came to prefer the term “Latino”. The Census does not classify persons of Portuguese or Brazilian descent as Hispanic, as those are Portuguese-speaking populations.

In Their Own Words: What Does Latinx Mean To Hispanics?

Text is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License; additional terms may apply. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Cuban culture has made its way into America thanks to many refugees and their talents. Maria Irene Fornes, a Cuban immigrant to the United States, created plays that focused on feminism and poverty.

As of 2014, about 67% of Hispanic Protestants and about 52% of Hispanic Catholics were renewalist, meaning that they described themselves as Pentecostal or charismatic Christians . Hispanics have also influenced the way English is spoken in the United States. In Miami, for example, the Miami dialect has evolved as the most common form of English spoken and heard in Miami today.

It’s an opportunity to provide important resources to Spanish-speaking women, said event organizer Beatriz Martinez, who has been working in outreach and community engagement for 17 years. Findings from this cross-sectional study should be interpreted in light of several limitations. First, although participant recruitment involved many local venues, we did not collect data identifying the recruitment sites in which participants learned about the study. Thus, potential differences in participants’ attributions could not be explored based on recruitment site. Census Bureau data (U.S. Census Bureau, 2008), Latinos as a group constituted 61.7% of the county’s total population.

Census Bureau as Cuban (32.6%), Other Latino (23.5%), Puerto Rican (3.7%), and Mexican (1.9%). Thus, the current sample was representative of Latinas living in Miami-Dade County, but not of the larger U.S. Future studies are needed with nationally representative samples to validate and enhance the generalizability of results. Nevertheless, marijuana use, alcohol and non-medical sedative use were linked with several attribution models. Higher frequencies of marijuana use were associated with disagreement with the moral/character models of addiction.

Because these findings are based on a community-based sample of Latina women, future research is needed to investigate if these types of attributions persist among clinical samples of substance abusing or dependent Latina adults. Perhaps such attributions influence their treatment choice, therapy processes, and treatment outcomes? For instance, a potential congruence between less acculturated, substance abusing adult Latinas’ spiritually and disease model based beliefs and 12-step models may suggest that self-help group attendance could be a culturally congruent treatment component for less acculturated Latina women. The purpose of the current study was to examine whether attributions about addiction in a community-based sample of predominantly immigrant Latina women are associated with socioeconomic and cultural factors, as well as substance use frequency and type.